Home ›

THE NIGERIAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY
ISSN: 0331-4111
Volume 5, No. 1,  2007

DOI: 10.36108/NJSA/7002/50(0170)

Team Performance in Neighbourhood Security: An Ethnographic Presentation of Indigenous Traditional Security System in Badagry
Alaba Simpson
Covenant University, Ota

Abstract
The paper discusses the neighbourhood security pattern in Badagry from an ethnographic perspective. It observes in particular, that Egun perception of security is located within the corporate existence of the people which is mostly based on their common ancestry, indigenous religious system and utmost respect for the social values of the land. Relying on the results of ethnographic studies, the paper pinpoints the central security role that is accorded to the traditional court system in the town. It emphasizes the position of this indigenous traditional judiciary institution as reflecting a cumulative catalogue of intricate networks of social control that are linked to the main-organs of security in the town. This is exemplified in the offices of Tayin, the female ‘overseer’ institution, the Kogan titled position of the Area leader and Zangbeto, the ‘night people’. The paper highlights the prevailing role played by the Legba, the town’s chief spiritual security officer that offers spiritual support for security efforts in the land. Finally, it concludes by noting that these separate but mutually dependent groups have lessons to offer for neighbourhood security conduct in other areas around Lagos since their carriage extends beyond the frontiers of mere The paper discusses the neighbourhood security pattern in Badagry from an ethnographic perspective. It observes in particular, that Egun perception of security is located within the corporate existence of the people which is mostly based on their common ancestry, indigenous religious system and utmost respect for the social values of the land. Relying on the results of ethnographic studies, the paper pinpoints the central security role that is accorded to the traditional court system in the town. It emphasizes the position of this indigenous traditional judiciary institution as reflecting a cumulative catalogue of intricate networks of social control that are linked to the main-organs of security in the town. This is exemplified in the offices of Tayin, the female ‘overseer’ institution, the Kogan titled position of the Area leader and Zangbeto, the ‘night people’. The paper highlights the prevailing role played by the Legba, the town’s chief spiritual security officer that offers spiritual support for security efforts in the land. Finally, it concludes by noting that these separate but mutually dependent groups have lessons to offer for neighbourhood security conduct in other areas around Lagos since their carriage extends beyond the frontiers of mere amorphous security groups that are commonly referred to as teams in everyday Nigerian parlance.

Download PDF